Your home’s exterior doors can contribute significantly to air leakage, and can also waste energy through conduction, especially if outdated, uninsulated, improperly installed, and/or improperly air sealed. Weatherstripping can reduce the energy losses due to air leakage.

SELECTING NEW EXTERIOR DOORS

New exterior doors often fit and insulate better than older types. If you have older doors in your home, replacing them might be a good investment, resulting in lower heating and cooling costs. If you’re building a new home, you should consider the most energy-efficient doors possible.

When selecting doors for energy efficiency, it’s important to first consider their energy performance ratings in relation to the local climate and your home’s design. This will help narrow your selection.

TYPES OF DOORS

One common type of exterior door has a metal skin with a polyurethane foam insulation core. These doors come with their own weatherstripping gasket installed and require no additional work to make them energy efficient.

Solid core wood doors are also very affective and are installed identical to metal doors, unfortunately they are lacking in the same insulating resistant’s value as the metal doors, but my be an option for those on a fixed budget.

Glass or “patio” doors, especially sliding glass doors, lose much more heat than other types of doors because glass is a very poor insulator. When buying or replacing patio doors, keep in mind that swinging doors offer a much tighter seal than sliding types.

INSTALLATION

We remove the entire original door, causing, trim and debris from the original door in order to assemble the new frame in the exact location covering all markings from the original door frame and leaving you with an eye popping reveal.

We remove the entire original door, causing, trim and debris from the original door in order to assemble the new frame in the exact location covering all markings from the original door frame and leaving you with an eye popping reveal.

In time, use of door opening and closing causes friction that may wear down the doors seals. Be sure to check the weatherstripping on your exterior doors annually to see if it is in need of replacement.

STORM DOORS

Adding a storm door can be a good investment if your existing door is old but still in good condition. However, adding a storm door to a newer, insulated door is not generally worth the expense, because you won’t save much more energy.

Storm door frames are usually made of aluminum, steel, fiberglass, or wood (painted or not). Wooden storm doors require more maintenance than the other types, keep this in mind when making your selections.

High-quality storm doors use low-emissivity (low-e) glass or glazing and insect screens for the summer. Many different features are available, pick ones that suit your homes needs.

 

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